We Visit Mdina

photo by Anne Pflug
The entrance gate to Mdina, the original capital of Malta. It dates to before the 12th Century.

Mdina is sometimes call The Silent City because of its thick walls which invite quiet.
Mdina was originally the capital of Malta. It traces its history to a time earlier than when St. Paul was shipwrecked in Malta and was said to have lived there.   It  is a medieval city with narrow streets, a gate that closes every night and is surrounded by a moat. I will touch up on more information about Mdina in future blogs.

If you enjoyed this, much more information is available in my   book:   Return to Malta   available from Amazon.com

The Church in Mosta

photo by Anne Pflug
The Church of the Assumption, in Mosta.

This is the famous church, in Mosta. Built between 1833 and 1860, it is said to have been inspired by the Pantheon in Rome.  During World War II, a bomb fell through the dome but did not explode. The Maltese people thought of this as a miracle. The now harmless bomb rests in the sacristy, always ready for photo opportunities.

 

If you enjoyed this, much more information is available in my book:   Return to Malta  available from Amazon.com

IL FORTIZZA

Il Fortizza, the Fort, is a restaurant we visited frequently.

This restaurant, in Sliema, is located across the street from our hotel. It was originally a Fort, one of  many in Malta.  Notice the original moat. One can see the pool in the back.  It belonged to our hotel and we used it often.  As you can see, the ‘beach’ is very rocky so the pool was always our first preference and since it was filled with sea water, we could enjoy swimming in the Mediterranean without slipping on the rocks.

 

 

If you enjoyed this, much more information is available in my  book:   Return to Malta  available from Amazon.com

 

Sliema, Malta

photo by Anne Pflug
The view from Sliema’s Promenade. Notice the “modern” buildings as well as construction cranes creating more of them.

This view of Malta is very different from most of the views you will see when in Malta. This is an area dedicated, it seems, solely for tourists. Once in a while, you might see an older building but mostly, older buildings are being demolished to create high rise condos for the tourist trade. This is not the Malta I remember, living here as a child.

 

If you enjoyed this, much more information is available in my  book:   Return to Malta   available from Amazon.com

Valletta’s New Entrance

photo by Anne Pflug
Under construction, the new entrance to Valletta, Malta

I was not thrilled when I heard that the beautiful bastions surrounding Valletta were being demolished to make room for a new, modern entrance to the capital.  I felt that history was being changed for the sake of modernity. As one can see, the architecture for this new gate is modern, streamlined and nothing like the original.  I still prefer history to change  in Malta. To me, it doesn’t seem to fit with Valletta’s architecture.

 

If you enjoyed this, much more information is available in my  book:   Return to Malta  available from Amazon.com

Fountain and Bus Terminal outside Valletta

photo by Anne Pflug
This beautiful fountain welcomes visitors to Valletta.
photo by Anne Pflug
The Bus Terminal outside of Valletta.

Just before you enter Valletta, the capital of Malta, you can see this beautiful fountain.  It is quite large, as compared to the visitors below. This fountain also enhances the Bus Terminal which is located surrounding it. To the left of the Terminal, one can see the Cathedral of Floriana; to the right, the long standing Phoenicia Hotel.

 

If you enjoyed this, much more information is available in my   book:   Return to Malta   available from Amazon.com