A Break from Sailing

photo by Anne Pflug
A quick refreshing dip in the Mediterranean

Halfway through our cruise around Malta, the Fernandes dropped anchor for our sumptuous lunch as well as for a quick cooling dip into the sea. We relaxed here and prepared to board the smaller boats that would take us into the caves of the Blue Lagoon. Also, once anchored in the secluded bay, many spent time swimming, snorkeling , sunbathing and otherwise enjoying relaxing on the spacious decks.  It was a continuation of a lovely day.

This blog annevisitsmalta.com enhances my book Return to Malta by visiting most of the places mentioned in the book with color photos. The book is available through Amazon and other book stores.

Be sure to visit my other blog: annepflugcom.wordpress.com

 

Ready for the cruise around Malta

photo by Anne Pflug
On the Fernandes, ready to start…

It was a beautiful day, just right for a cruise around the island of Malta.  We boarded a Turkish gullet, The Fernandes, and were very excited to spend this gorgeous day at sea. We picked up the schooner in Sliema and were soon on our way, northward towards Gozo.   It was a perfect day.

 

This blog annevisitsmalta.com enhances my book Return to Malta by visiting most of the places mentioned in the book with color photos. The book is available through Amazon and other book stores.

Be sure to visit my other blog: annepflugcom.wordpress.com

The Church Ceiling in Mosta

photo by Anne Pflug
The repaired dome in the church in Mosta

During World War II, a bomb fell through the dome of this church but did not explode. The Maltese people thought it was a miracle and neutralized the bomb and now have it on display.  If you look carefully, you will see where the bomb had fallen through and where the  dome was repaired. If you divide the decorated dome into quadrants, you can see the ‘not so perfect’ repair job in the upper left quadrant.  I have a feeling that it wasn’t repaired perfectly so that all who look up can see this evidence of this miracle.

This blog annevisitsmalta.com enhances my book Return to Malta by visiting most of the places mentioned in the book with color photos. The book is available through Amazon and other book stores.

Be sure to visit my other blog: annepflugcom.wordpress.com

Streets in Valletta

photo by Anne Pflug
A typical street in Valletta

There are three qualities to the streets in Valletta.  They are narrow.  They are extremely hilly and they are surrounded by balconies. Notice that the balconies come in several styles. The closed ones are usually wood, painted in a variety of colors.  the open one are metal and they display a variety of designs. The two balconies seen on the left are excellent examples of this variety. One is curved with a very delicate and lacy design; the other is angular and somewhat geometric.  Traveling around Malta would give one many examples of these two styles. One thing they have in common; they are all beautiful!

This blog annevisitsmalta.com enhances my book Return to Malta by visiting most of the places mentioned in the book with color photos. The book is available through Amazon and other book stores.

Be sure to visit my other blog: annepflugcom.wordpress.com

A golden Altar

photo by Anne Pflug
One of the many altars in Maltese churches that is embellished with gold

Historically, Malta is a very Catholic country. This is a result of St. Paul’s shipwreck in Malta on his way to martyrdom in Rome. Every village in  Malta has at least one church; some have more.  All these churches, as in most of Europe, have been embellished with gold, some on the altars, others more so, on the walls and even ceilings.

The idea had been that churches are houses of God and God deserves the best, that is, gold. I remember, as a child, hearing about a new church being built and the congregation being asked to donate gold, for melting, to be used in church.

Actually, I even remember that happening in Brooklyn when a church was being built in the last century.

This blog annevisitsmalta.com enhances my book Return to Malta by visiting most of the places mentioned in the book with color photos. The book is available through Amazon and other book stores.

Be sure to visit my other blog: annepflugcom.wordpress.com

 

The Maltese Cross

photo by Anne Pflug
The Maltese Cross as jewelry

In the last blog, I photographed the Maltese Cross on the flag used on ships registered in Malta. In other uses, the Maltese Cross is a major subject of jewelry featured in tourist shops as well as high end jewelry stores. As a tourist enters a jewelry store in Malta, she is surrounded by many versions of this cross, in gold, silver or enamel.  The most common version is the filigree as the illustration above shows.  Filigree jewelry is a Maltese specialty and that style really shows the cross at its best.  I’m sure that most Maltese ladies have at least one version of this cross as a pendant, earrings or bracelet.  It is a beautiful addition to anyone’s jewelry box.

This blog annevisitsmalta.com enhances my book Return to Malta by visiting most of the places mentioned in the book with color photos. The book is available through Amazon and other book stores.

Be sure to visit my other blog: annepflugcom.wordpress.com

An American cruise ship entering Valletta

photo by Anne Pflug
The Maltese flag on an American cruise ship

It’s always so exciting to see the nautical Maltese flag on a cruise I’m taking, even ones not  to Malta.  Although the official Maltese flag is white and red with the George Cross insignia, seafaring vessels sport a different version.  This flag, red with a white border and the Maltese cross in the center, is one you’d find on any seafaring vessel registered in Malta.

Not sure about others but I do know that Celebrity Cruises registers its cruise ships in Malta and I always look for that beautiful flag.  It’s usually flying on the same deck where we breakfast.  To me, it’s a beautiful sight!!

This blog annevisitsmalta.com enhances my book Return to Malta by visiting most of the places mentioned in the book with color photos. The book is available through Amazon and other book stores.

Be sure to visit my other blog: annepflugcom.wordpress.com